Freedom of the Press Lecture Series: full line up!

The Bill of Rights for High School Students Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 3:00 pm

What can students say and do to exercise the First Amendment right of free speech and freedom of religion in schools?  How has the Supreme Court ruled on these issues, and what avenues of redress are open to students if they think that their rights have been violated?  These and other questions will be explored in this session. Geared for teens, adults are welcome too! This program will be led by Stephen McGrath, CCSU History Department.

The Popularity of Alexander Hamilton Thursday, September 13, 2018, 3:00 pm

Discover the inspiring story of the Alexander Hamilton, who stood for American ideals. Bev York, Education    Director for the Windham Textile and History Museum, will share an illustrated talk about his contributions, struggles, and tragic death.  After years of being perceived as having only a supporting role, Hamilton’s star has risen, confirming his belief that “Those who stand for nothing fall for anything.”

Social Media, the Press, and Us        Monday, September 17, 2018, 6:30 pm

The everyday reality of media use around the globe is changing rapidly due to the proliferation of smart phones, tablets and multiple screens that allow access to, and immediate dissemination of, the news. The US President prefers to communicate via twitter feed while labeling mainstream journalism as “fake news”; Facebook data has been hacked to access personal information about users’ likes and dislikes. Many teenagers communicate via text messages rather than in person, let alone speak on the phone. This talk will focus on the way social   media is not only shaping our human relationships in a digital age but also our understanding of the world around us. How does user-generated content allow for new participatory energies to develop while also deeply affecting cultural identities and generating new types of intimacies. Lecture and discussion led by Dr. Karen Ritzenhoff, CCSU Communication Department.

A PDF of additional reading materials for this series is available on the library’s website. Find it by visiting www.avonctlibrary.info, and typing Freedom of the Press Reading into the search box. The first result contains the PDF.

Completed lectures:

Inside the Inaugural Address: Lessons in the Great American Experiment    

Parties, the Press, and Political Politeness: Well, Not Really! 

The Alien and Sedition Acts

The Enigma of Benjamin Franklin

Discovering Katherine Graham 

“We Hold These Truths”: The Declaration of Independence;  A Single Page that Changed the World 

“Four Freedoms” Lecture series this winter!

Co-sponsored by the Avon Library and Avon Senior Center, this series of five programs explores the themes of Norman Rockwell’s “Four Freedoms” paintings.  Join us we welcome the Norman Rockwell Museum to kick off the series, and then invite our favorite professors to lecture and discuss each of the freedoms individually.  Attend one, or all of these events. Look for a bus trip to the Norman Rockwell Museum in late winter to conclude this series!

All ages welcome. Sponsored by the Avon Taxpayer’s Association and the Mitnick Trust.

There are no upcoming events at this time.

The Avon Newsletter, a World War II collection, is now available online!

The Avon Newsletter- WWII newsletter headlineExplore 14 pieces of WWII history.

Thanks to the generosity of the Friends of the Avon Library, Katie Kukiolczynski, CCSU MA History graduate, was hired to process, scan, and summarize the World War II newsletter collection with the Marion Hunter History Room of the Avon Library.

This collection consists of 14 resident-created newsletters spanning the years 1943-1946. The newsletters were intended for Avon soldiers, and were sent to them wherever they were stationed, either at home or abroad, as well as to their families in Avon.

In addition to uploading the actual newsletters, Katie detailed military commendations and created highlights of each issue. Some of these highlights include personal accounts from soldiers experiences in battle, their military training, details of what it was like where they were stationed, and even their experiences to how drastically things changed after the war ended in places like Germany.

The newsletters also included some local town gossip and news for soldiers to stay up to date on current happenings around town, so Avon was always a part of them wherever they were.

View the collection here!