Library News

Reference Librarian Barbara’s Pick

Niki Jabbour’s veggie garden remix : 224 new plants to shake up your garden and add variety, flavor, and fun / Niki Jabbour  (2018 non-fiction, 635 Jabbour)

Presents planting and growing advice for 224 varieties of unusual vegetable and herbs from around the world, including the Cape gooseberry, Middle Eastern molokhia, Asian celtuce, Japanese winter squash, and Thai basil.

Reference Librarian Christine’s Pick

The power of habit : why we do what we do in life and business / Charles Duhigg (2012 non-fiction, 158.1 Duhigg)

Identifies the neurological processes behind behaviors, explains how self-control and success are largely driven by habits, and shares scientifically-based guidelines for achieving personal goals and overall well-being by adjusting specific habits.

Save

Reference Librarian Christine’s Pick

The book of hygge : the Danish art of contentment, comfort, and connection / Louisa Thomsen Brits ; photography by Susan Bell (2017 non-fiction, 158.1 Brits)

A full-color lifestyle guide to the centuries-old Danish art of togetherness and contentment shares advice for incorporating hygge practices into everyday life, from making coffee together at breakfast and sharing meals to sitting beside a fire or snuggling into bed with a good book.

Reference Librarian Patrice’s Pick

Under the wide and starry sky : a novel / Nancy Horan  (2014 fiction, F Horan)

Imagines the unconventional love affair of Scottish literary giant Robert Louis Stevenson and American divorcee Fanny Van de Grift Osbourne, who after meeting in late-19th-century rural France take refuge from their respective unhappy lives and embark on two shared decades of international turbulence.

Reference Librarian Cyndi’s Pick

What she knew / Gilly Macmillan (2016 fiction, F Macmillan)

Rachel Jenner is walking in a Bristol park with her eight-year-old son Ben when he asks if he can run ahead. It’s an ordinary request on an ordinary Sunday afternoon, and Rachel has no reason to worry–until Ben vanishes. Police are called, search parties go out, and Rachel, already insecure after her recent divorce, feels herself coming undone. As hours and then days pass without a sign of Ben, everyone who knew him is called into question, from Rachel’s newly married ex-husband to her mother-of-the-year sister.

Freedom of the Press Lecture Series: full line up!

The Bill of Rights for High School Students Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 3:00 pm

What can students say and do to exercise the First Amendment right of free speech and freedom of religion in schools?  How has the Supreme Court ruled on these issues, and what avenues of redress are open to students if they think that their rights have been violated?  These and other questions will be explored in this session. Geared for teens, adults are welcome too! This program will be led by Stephen McGrath, CCSU History Department.

The Popularity of Alexander Hamilton Thursday, September 13, 2018, 3:00 pm

Discover the inspiring story of the Alexander Hamilton, who stood for American ideals. Bev York, Education    Director for the Windham Textile and History Museum, will share an illustrated talk about his contributions, struggles, and tragic death.  After years of being perceived as having only a supporting role, Hamilton’s star has risen, confirming his belief that “Those who stand for nothing fall for anything.”

Social Media, the Press, and Us        Monday, September 17, 2018, 6:30 pm

The everyday reality of media use around the globe is changing rapidly due to the proliferation of smart phones, tablets and multiple screens that allow access to, and immediate dissemination of, the news. The US President prefers to communicate via twitter feed while labeling mainstream journalism as “fake news”; Facebook data has been hacked to access personal information about users’ likes and dislikes. Many teenagers communicate via text messages rather than in person, let alone speak on the phone. This talk will focus on the way social   media is not only shaping our human relationships in a digital age but also our understanding of the world around us. How does user-generated content allow for new participatory energies to develop while also deeply affecting cultural identities and generating new types of intimacies. Lecture and discussion led by Dr. Karen Ritzenhoff, CCSU Communication Department.

A PDF of additional reading materials for this series is available on the library’s website. Find it by visiting www.avonctlibrary.info, and typing Freedom of the Press Reading into the search box. The first result contains the PDF.

Completed lectures:

Inside the Inaugural Address: Lessons in the Great American Experiment    

Parties, the Press, and Political Politeness: Well, Not Really! 

The Alien and Sedition Acts

The Enigma of Benjamin Franklin

Discovering Katherine Graham 

“We Hold These Truths”: The Declaration of Independence;  A Single Page that Changed the World